Do you believe in Utopia?

Utopia.  A perfect place, with people living in harmonious physical and psychosocial conditions. I think it’s something we should try for. Yet I’m sure you’ll agree when I say I believe we’re a long way from realising the Utopian vision.

High-rise living: not Utopia.

I’ve carried out voluntary work for over 20 years.  I’ve previously spent time working with and learning from kids’ clubs, youth groups and befriending adults with disabilities. Latterly, I’ve  supported foreign students with their academic studies and provided consultancy support to charities. Professionally, I’ve been employed in the community development and education sector for over a decade. I’ve worked with some of the most marginalised people in our society. This has included young people with no qualifications; asylum seekers and refugees; lone parents; the long-term unemployed and people with mental health problems.

All of the roles described above have something in common.  All were carried out in geographical communities that experience ‘multiple deprivations’ ( I also live in such a place). Deprivation in this context means issues such as a high proportion of low income households, high youth unemployment, lower than average educational attainment, poor housing and high percentages of lone-parent households. In recent years, my interests and experiences  have led me to seek out higher education, grasping to put names to the things I knew I didn’t know I knew!  I now have  the privilege and benefit of a Community development degree, and I am currently working on my dissertation for an MSc in Teaching Adults.

Both my personal, educational and professional experiences, as described above,  have converged.  I  do understand the importance of the many separate yet interconnected community projects that try to improve society. But I often feel the physical reality of places are overlooked. Thankfully, asides from amassing £20k+ of student debt, my studies have also gifted me with a new tool-  Psychogeography. The exact definition is contested. But I think the term lends itself well to what I am interested in. That is,  exploring and documenting ‘place’ in an attempt to understand the way we live and the problems we face.  I started working towards this almost accidentally on instagram six months ago, capturing images to show the places I see. The questions and themes that emerged in some of my more imaginative and evocative images are the focus of this blog. They include:

  • Where are the places that inspire us?
  • How do people interact with the spaces that they inherit?
  • Who are the rule makers, rule breakers and rule keepers?
  • What evidence exists that people know better than planners?
  • What makes a space a rejected place?

So, pleased to meet you as I embark upon a psychogeographic jaunt and ramble. Mostly, I’ll focus on the beautifully complicated, friendly and gritty city of Glasgow. But there’s also a strong supporting role for Cumbernauld, my newtown hometown. I’m hoping to hear your thoughts along the way. The first thing I’d like to ask- do you believe in Utopia?